Dubliners

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Dubliners, we can see specific experiences that are determined by gender, class, and race. We see a variety of people with anxiety and concern over their social experiences
The research paper is a 5 page (1250words) paper that employs close readings on one primary text (you may of course talk about more than one story) and enters into conversation with at least two critical sources (ideally, one from the back of the Norton Critical Edition, and one from a Footnote or OED). These may be found in the library, on JSTOR or Project MUSE or in your Norton Critical Edition. All papers need to be typed, double-spaced, 12 pt, Standard font, one-inch margins, on 8.5×11 paper. Must include a word count at the end and employ MLA citation style.

This research paper will primarily employ the close reading and analytic writing skills you’ve employed (and perfected!) in prior essays, and that we’ve discussed throughout the semester. Focusing on two stories from Joyce’s Dubliners, address one of the questions below. Remember, that in answering these questions you will want to develop your arguments through close readings of certain key passages in the text. When you introduce textual evidence, be sure to cite it correctly, and explicate the text you’ve brought in to discuss.
Your paper must employ 1 critical source. I highly recommend the essays in the Norton Critical Edition. Your use of the critical sources is to help enhance and develop your interpretation of the text—but not to overwhelm it. Be sure to develop your own thoughts and voice, and let the critical sources you use to enter your thoughts into a conversation with these articles. You may do this by finding support for your own reading in the critical essay, or for arguing against the position or observation made in a critical essay.

1. Dubliners, we can see specific experiences that are determined by gender, class, and race. We see a variety of people with anxiety and concern over their social experiences: from shifting hierarchies between men and women, to varying class positions from poor laborers and swindlers to wealthier upper classes. How are these experiences of gender OR class OR race (of course, pick one) important for the developing identity of the characters?